Feb. 10, 2020

Joint Force Quarterly 96 (1st Quarter, January 2020)

This issue of JFQ covers many topics about the decade ahead. In our Forum section there’s an article about the Australian Army’s efforts to advance intellectual development. In JPME Today, we cover the JPME experience and the nature of war. In Commentary, authors write about climate change and great power competition. In our Features section are articles about the role of chaplains in humanitarian assistance and aerial combat during the Vietnam War. Finally, we review Andrew Marble’s biography of former CJCS General John Shalikashvilli. As usual, good thinking leads to good writing on many issues facing the Joint Force.

Feb. 10, 2020

Joint Doctrine Update

Joint Doctrine Updates.

Feb. 10, 2020

The Future of Interagency Doctrine

Interagency synchronization continues to challenge whole-of-government approaches to national security. The Joint Staff has been brainstorming ideas to improve workforce interoperability within the context of joint doctrine. In addition, the Joint Staff created a pathway for non-DOD entities to become more involved in the development process of joint doctrine. Subjects of interest included inter-organizational cooperation, protection of civilians, defense support to civil authorities, joint planning and intelligence activities, special operations, counterdrug operations, countering weapons of mass destruction, and combating terrorism. CJCS General Mark Milley indicated that listening to non-DOD contributors is important to building an adaptive and agile force.

Feb. 10, 2020

Harnessing Artificial Intelligence and Autonomous Systems Across the Seven Joint Functions

The Joint Force is not well positioned to share best practices in artificial intelligence and autonomous systems (AI/AS). To address this shortcoming, Joint Manning Documents should add an AI/AS cell made up of officers and NCOs in order to incorporate best practices across the seven joint functions. The Army took a similar approach in 2003 with the creation of knowledge management as a distinct discipline and staff function. In order to avoid fighting tomorrow’s conflicts with yesterday’s weapons, the Joint Force should change the way it organizes and employs forces, and embrace a new approach to technological innovation.

Feb. 10, 2020

Failed Megacities and the Joint Force

The greatest international challenge of the 21st century may be the advent the megacity, an urban environment with a population of 10 million people or more. The problems the Joint Force could face when operating in a megacity would stretch the limits of US military capacity. Although joint doctrine addresses traditional urban terrain, it neglects to address the challenges associated with megacities, especially failed megacities. Given the high probability of a failed megacity and the need for military support, the DOD must develop joint doctrine that adequately addresses the challenges posed by operations in a failed megacity.

Feb. 10, 2020

White House Warriors: How the National Security Council Transformed the American Way of War

Edward Salo reviews White House Warriors: How the National Security Council Transformed the American Way of War by John Gans. This book enlightens readers about the foreign policy and national security decision-making process, and demonstrates the importance of experts with bureaucratic, functional and area expertise to maintain a strong national security policy.

Feb. 10, 2020

Japan Rearmed: The Politics of Military Power

Nathaniel L. Moir reviews Japan Rearmed: The Politics of Military Power by Sheila Smith. For national security professionals and those in the Joint Force focused on the Asia-Pacific region, this book is an authoritative account on the Japanese Self Defense Force and a good reminder of the importance of US-Japan relations.

Feb. 10, 2020

Small Arms: Children and Terrorism

Kira McFadden reviews Small Arms: Children and Terrorism by Mia Bloom and John Horgan. This book is a deep dive into an under-examined issue, the long term challenges of children in terrorist organizations. It is a must read for policymakers and planners working to end generational cycles of violent extremism.

Feb. 10, 2020

Attaining Maritime Superiority in an A2/AD Era: Lessons from the Battle of the Bismarck Sea

As China and Russia continue to acquire and integrate precision-guided long-range missiles into their weapons systems, Anti-Access/Area Denial (A2/AD) is one of the toughest challenges to American maritime dominance. Strategists often look to history to solve current defense problems, and WWII may teach lessons applicable to today’s context. The author uses the 1943 Battle of the Bismarck Sea as a case study to highlight the role of land-based airpower in maritime interdiction. By looking through a counter-A2/AD lens, this battle offers an interesting perspective on attaining maritime dominance in this era of global integration and great power competition.

Feb. 10, 2020

Frustrated Cargo: The U.S. Army’s Limitations in Projecting Force from Ship to Shore in an A2/AD Environment

The Korean peninsula, Taiwan and numerous other contested islands and landmasses in the Pacific highlight the need for a revised Anti-Access/Area Denial (A2/AD) strategy. The current joint concept relies on a relatively small initial entry force of Marines to establish a lodgment with the preponderance of the Army combat power flowing as follow-on forces through established ports. However, using historical examples the author argues that the Army needs to develop new training and doctrine to support over-the-shore maneuver. This would provide complementary capabilities to the Marine Corps and make better use of Army assets to support the Joint Force.