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Category: JFQ Articles

Nov. 18, 2019

Joint Doctrine Updates

Joint Doctrine Updates

Nov. 18, 2019

Unmasking the Spectrum with Artificial Intelligence

Imagine you are a combatant commander (CCDR) equipped with the latest capabilities today’s military has to offer. Your troops are armed with fifth-generation aircraft, precision-strike capabilities, advanced naval forces, and fully networked combat arms and land forces. From your command center you can precisely observe your forces on the battlefield, and your surveillance equipment allows unmitigated access to their actions and communications in real time. However, when you take this state-of-the-art force into combat against a near-peer competitor, nothing seems to work.

Nov. 18, 2019

Subordinating Intelligence

Long experiences in Iraq, Afghanistan, and other conflicts have resulted in an increased emphasis on civil-military relationships and the interagency community in U.S. doctrine. Predeployment training now includes exercises requiring coordination with Embassies, Ambassadors, and U.S. and international agencies. Harnessing, aligning, and integrating the collective expertise and capabilities found in these organizations is essential for mission accomplishment. This integration cannot be assumed in mission planning; it requires closer coordination than previously understood, mutual understanding, and intentionality at all levels.

Nov. 18, 2019

Sailing True North

Character is being widely discussed on the national stage today, and it is the main subject of Sailing True North: Ten Admirals and the Voyage of Character. This new title spans the arc of time from Themistocles to current-day admirals. For each of his subjects, the author distills their stories and key attributes. I have known Jim Stavridis for more than 30 years and most recently worked closely with him in my role as CEO and Publisher at the U.S. Naval Institute when he was Chair of the Board.

Nov. 18, 2019

The Lessons of Tragedy

The field of international relations is awash with books on world order, “the system of norms, rules, and power relationships that regulates international affairs” (p. 42). While military concerns often focus on technical or operational issues, senior officers and strategists need to understand the evolving world order to understand the strategic context that underpins their work.

Nov. 18, 2019

Wolfe, Montcalm, and the Principles of Joint Operations in the Quebec Campaign of 1759

A critical campaign analysis of the French and Indian War’s 1759 Quebec campaign demonstrates that Britain achieved victory because it reflected the principles of joint operations better than its French enemy did. While the British lacked a doctrinal publication that listed principles of joint operations, the thought processes and underlying concepts similar to our current doctrinal principles unmistakably shaped their military thought.

Nov. 18, 2019

The Chain Home Early Warning Radar System: A Case Study in Defense Innovation

The United Kingdom began the Battle of Britain in an unenviable position. After the fall of France and evacuation of Dunkirk, Britons were justifiably concerned about Germany’s next move and the potential for an attack on England. Fortunately, when the Luftwaffe attack came, the British government had already created the world’s first integrated air defense system.

Nov. 18, 2019

3D Printing for Joint Agile Operations

Additive manufacturing (AM), also known as 3D printing, could enable future agile operating concepts. AM has the ability to significantly shorten the Department of Defense (DOD) logistics chain, especially where repair parts are concerned, by producing the parts as they are needed. This would enable rapid, flexible response to unanticipated faults or battle damage with reduced stockpile requirements, increasing the agility of the operational force. However, to fully and efficiently capitalize on the potential of AM, DOD must develop common data solutions and standardized safety, certification, and requisition processes for AM, leveraging data science to prioritize development efforts by cost savings and implementation impact. An integrated effort by the joint enterprise is required to overcome Service independence and technology implementation challenges to make joint agile sustainment a reality.

Nov. 18, 2019

Development Beyond the Joint Qualification System: An Overview

In 1986, Congress passed the Goldwater-Nichols Department of Defense Reorganization Act, leading to substantial reforms in joint officer personnel policy and management. Goldwater-Nichols requirements were based on concerns that the Department of Defense (DOD) had paid insufficient attention to joint officer management and on a perception that there were disincentives to serving in joint assignments. Twenty years after Goldwater-Nichols, continued congressional interest in joint officer development resulted in the 2007 requirement for DOD to establish different levels of joint qualification and supporting criteria for each level.1 In response to this congressional requirement, DOD evaluated the state of Joint Officer Management (JOM) and the Joint Specialty Officer designation process and implemented the Joint Qualification System (JQS) to support a more strategic human resource approach to JOM.2

Nov. 18, 2019

Countering Threat Networks to Deter, Compete, and Win: Competition Below Armed Conflict with Revisionist Powers

The current geopolitical environment is the most complex, dynamic, and dangerous the United States has ever faced. During the Cold War, the Nation squared off against a superpower rival in the Soviet Union, and since its collapse, the United States has battled an assortment of rogue regimes and violent extremist organizations (VEOs). While rogue regimes and VEOs remain a threat to U.S. and allies’ security, the United States must also contend with the threat posed by not one but two major state competitors, China and Russia, each fielding significant nuclear and conventional forces.1 The 2018 National Defense Strategy directs the Department of Defense (DOD) to focus on “long-term, strategic competition” with these two “revisionist powers,” whose regional and global ambitions are at odds with those of the United States and its allies, while also continuing to keep rogue regimes and VEOs at bay.