Jan. 1, 2005

DTP-008: Battle-Wise: Gaining Advantage in Networked Warfare

This paper summarizes a forthcoming National Defense University book suggesting why and how the U.S. and allied forces should improve the cognitive faculties of military decisionmakers to attain new operational and strategic advantages or to avoid the loss of advantages they now enjoy.

Jan. 1, 2005

DTP-009: Container Security: A Proposal for a Comprehensive Code of Conduct

This paper recommends the development and adoption of a comprehensive Code of Conduct that would be globally recognized and enforced for the improved security in the shipping trade, including some procedures on containers, which has become an important component of global commerce.

Dec. 1, 2004

Eliminating Adversary WMD: What's at Stake?

This Occasional Paper discusses the challenges and the lessons learned during Operation Iraqi Freedom concerning WMD elimination.

Dec. 1, 2004

Military Transformation and Joint Experimentation: Two Views from Above

Military transformation— “a process that shapes the changing nature of military competition and cooperation through new combinations of concepts, capabilities, people and organizations”— is on the minds and agendas of everyone dealing with the military. Many people talk about transformation; the two authors of this Defense Horizons have done something about it. In fact, they are among the few who have been responsible for shaping and implementing the concept. To get a better idea of what goes into this process, particularly the element of joint experimentation that is helping to identify and define the nature of change, Defense Horizons presents the views of two of America’s leading military officers who have been involved in the process.

Nov. 15, 2004

DTP-007: Shedding Light on the Battlefield: Tactical Applications of Photonic Technology

This paper addresses the growing availiability and dependence on tactical sensor technology on bandwidth for the battlfield and recommends the use of light, or photons, to transmit information. It highlights the advantages of photonics in three applications and discusses the economical and technological advantages for increasing the use of photonics for the U.S. government and military.

Nov. 1, 2004

DTP-006: Shaping Future Defense Budgets

This paper assesses key issues in the U.S. defense spending in the next decade and is intended to serve as a guide to analyzing the fiscal year 2006 budget submission.

Oct. 1, 2004

DTP-005: Bridging the Gap: European C4ISR Capabilities and Transatlantic Interoperability

This study analyzes the developed and planned C4ISR capabilities of seven European countries and examines the extent to which advanced C4ISR and network doctrines figure in the defense planning of these nations and explore the content of interoperability within and between these national forces and between these forces and those of the United States.

Sept. 1, 2004

Needed—A NATO Stabilization and Reconstruction Force

At the Istanbul Summit in June 2004 , NATO endorsed the further transformation of military capabilities to make them “more modern, more usable, and more deployable to carry out the full range of Alliance missions.” The Istanbul Communiqué especially called for continuing progress on the NATO Response Force and the Prague Capabilities Commitments.

Sept. 1, 2004

DTP-004: Cooperative Threat Reduction for a New Era

The purpose of this study is to review the techniques developed and used by the Nunn-Lugar program to dat, including some closely related activities, and to recommend specific ways in which these techniques could be applied on a global basis to eliminate the various types of nuclear threats faced by the United States.

July 1, 2004

Defense Laboratories and Military Capability: Headed for a BRACdown?

For 150 years, military laboratories have made vital contributions to national defense. In recent years, they have been significantly reduced in number by several rounds of base realignment and closure (BRAC). Even so, they remain the primary source of internal technical competence within the Department of Defense (DOD). Their capability in that role will depend on how DOD answers two questions. Is there excess laboratory capacity - too many laboratories relative to forecasts of future force structure? What is their military value - their likely contribution to the future operational needs of warfighters.